Sirena Gorda safely in port in Brookings, OR. Just 2 days before a massive storm rolls in....

 

It’s been a while since i’ve really written about cruising Sirena Gorda, so here goes! ....So my nearly two weeks in Oregon resulted in just 160 miles of progress, but at this point, i’m happy about that. Singlehanding a (mostly) engineless 27-foot boat down the Oregon coast in the winter time is not for the faint of heart... After getting back to my boat from France, I found myself with a pefect 2-day weather window to head south. Getting sorted and provisioned the first day and leaving that afternoon, I was in Newport for just 18 hours before leaving the dock and sailing down the coast to Coos Bay. Leaving on a big ebb tide, “Sirena Gorda” romped along at 8+ knots over ground when exiting the Yaquina River Bar. Turning south in about 18 knots of breeze, I was running almost dead downwind. Dropped the jib and went main only and it was amazingly comfortable, not all that slow and very easy on the autopilot. Perfect. I slept pretty much the whole evening and night in 20-minute cat naps and actually slowed the boat down at times so that I reached Coos Bay on the morning flood tide, just as the sun was coming up. 

Read more...

Video I took from the team RIB of "Acciona", as we escorted Spanish skipper Javier "Bubi" Sanso to the Vendee Gloibe start. More than 300,000 passionate sailing fans braved the weather to cheer on all 20 skippers in the race. Truly the greatest spectacle in all of sport.

After 13 days in France covering the Vendee Globe race as a journalist for the website Sailing Anarchy, I am headed home to California and then on to "Sirena Gorda" in Oregon. Wow, what can I say... the last two weeks have been incredible! If you know me, then you know that competing in this epic race is my life goal, so to get an in-depth look at the scene, the boats, the skipers was just incredible. By being a journalist with SA, I literally got to crawl around about half ot he boats with a GoPro and take video, ask questionsa and then write articles about the boats. And working with Alan Block (aka Mr Clean), we interviewed literally every single skipper in the race, so that was amazing as well, getting to meet all of the different characters who make this race so special; the heroes that we read about ascending masts at sea, setting jury-rigs in the lee of islands and sailing into storms to rescue their stricken competitors. After coming home from France, I'm more inspired than ever to work on putting together a campaign for the Vendee Globe and that's what I am making my next goal/ project. 

Read more...

Here's an article that I wroote for Sailing Anarchy (www.SailingAnarchy.com) about our recent wounded veteran's clinic in San Francisco, October 3-6. 

 

I remember the first time that I went sailing. It was on an overcast grey day in San Diego Bay in early 2008. Giddy with excitement upon arriving at the marina and boarding the boat, I quickly stowed my gear and took my place as crew in helping us disembark from the dock. As we left the protection of the harbor, we hoisted the sails and shut off the engine. A cool fresh breeze filled the sails, heeling the boat and silently pushing us toward open water. As I felt the boat power up for the first time, I was captivated by the serenity and raw power of a boat, under sail, purposefully accelerating to hull speed.

Read more...

 

Sorry for not updating the blog. I’m bad about that sometimes!! This blog is kind of long....

 

After returning from Newport, RI at the end of September, we shoved off from Neah Bay, WA and rounded Cape Flattery, headed south. Throwing up my new to me spinnaker, we kite-reached south until the breeze began dying again. The spinnaker was sort of collapsing and re-filling for a couple of hours and then bang it went! The halyard chafed through and failed, bringing the sail down on deck. 

Read more...

who's online

We have 10 guests and no members online

Back to Top